Tag Archive: The Colony of Slippermen


In “The Colony of Slippermen” and the beginning of the fourth side of the vinyl, Rael meets a group of grotesquely deformed men; the Slipperman costume Peter Gabriel wore for the Lamb tour was the same as what’s described in the song. Upon meeting one of them, Rael discovers that he is indeed one of them, all having fallen prey to the lamias’ charms.

Rael’s brother John makes his 3rd appearance – the first being during “In the Cage,” the second in “The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging.” He, too, has become a Slipperman, and the only cure for their condition is… um, castration.

If you’ve never heard “The Colony of Slippermen” before and you’re learning about it for the first time now, I know what you’re thinking, because I thought it too. I believe the modern way of conveying the sentiment is WTF??!!?!?

you have issues, my friend...

you have issues, my friend…

Against my better judgment, I’m gonna dip my toe into the ocean of psychosis Peter Gabriel is revealing here. So the progression goes Rael meets the lamia, Rael becomes a Slipperman, Rael visits Doktor Dyper to get castrated, Rael is cured. The rather obvious parallel to the lamia sequence is that there’s an inherent connection between sex and devouring, like a black widow killing and eating her mate. Likewise, the parallel to the Slippermen sequence is this: sex causes deformity, and elimination of the sexual urge cures the deformity.

Again, WTF??!!?!?

Anyway, there’re some bits about John abandoning Rael again when he’s needed, Rael having the chance to get out of this nightmareland and back to his beloved N.Y.C., and saving John from drowning only to find it’s not John but (GASP!) himself.

Honestly, the story of Rael and his journey lost me a long time ago. I agree with Tony Banks when he says that the story aspect of The Lamb is the weakest thing about it. It contains some simply amazing musical elements (the mind-bending heaviness of “In the Cage,” the timeless beauty of “The Carpet Crawlers,” the brief but epic keyboard solo in “The Colony of Slippermen,” others…) and the lyrics present some great ideas, but the actual plot is bizarre and directionless. I get that it’s a sort of Pilgrim’s Progress and that it’s more about the journey than the endpoint, but it winds up more like Naked Lunch without all the drug references.

Speaking of endpoints, the last thing that happens in the plot of The Lamb is Rael finding out that John is really himself. While this brings up questions of the definition of self and other existential issues, it’s quickly forgotten about with the instant segue into the capping track, “it.” The sweeping and epic tone of “it” are offset by its breakneck tempo; it’s easily the fastest song on The Lamb. The lyrics to “it” are very philosophical, descending into a soup of all the things it is. “It is chicken / it is eggs.” “It is real / it is Rael.” By the way, I’ve tried turning “it is Rael” into “it Israel” and making that mean something – it was futile.

The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway marked a change in the way the band operated, a way that proved unsustainable. With Banks, Rutherford, Hackett and Collins composing the music without Gabriel’s input, and Peter writing the lyrics alone, it put strains on what was before a very democratic band.

Partway through the writing process, Peter got his ego stroked by William Friedkin; Having just directed The Exorcist to great success, he wanted to remake Hollywood by bringing in all new people, including Peter as an “ideas man,” based on one of his song intro stories printed on the back of Genesis Live. After the band made it clear that he couldn’t work on the album and be Friedkin’s hanger-on, Gabriel said goodbye to Genesis. Horrified that he might have been responsible for Genesis breaking up, Friedkin backed off, and Gabriel returned to work. But the rest of Genesis could sense the beginning of the end, because they then knew that this could happen at any time.

Add to that the birth of Peter’s first child and the innumerable difficulties with the delivery. Doctors initially didn’t think Anna-Marie Gabriel would survive. Quite naturally, that ordeal became the center of Peter’s world in both thought and deed, and that meant his work with Genesis was dwarfed. But rather than responding with caring and humanity, the other band members were very unsupportive. That, I think, sealed the deal on Peter Gabriel leaving. He had the courtesy to finish the album and the following tour, but it was a poorly-kept secret that this would be Gabriel’s last hurrah with Genesis.

To me, The Lamb is kind of like a train wreck that explodes in glorious fireworks. It’s quite an awful sight, but a beautiful one too. It confuses me, frustrates me, fascinates me, and ultimately leaves me wanting more. Even though it never has a payoff, I can’t walk away from it – I don’t even want to, because it’s such a fantastic mess. It does what a precious few great pieces of art can, and that’s constantly being ALMOST within reach of its spectators… but not quite.

The Slipperman

The Slipperman

I’ve already noted Peter Gabriel’s tendency toward the dramatic and propensity for wearing costumes during Genesis performances. There’s the bat hat he wore for “Watcher of the Skies,” and the flower head and Magog, both for “Supper’s Ready.” There was also a character named Britannia he created for “Dancing With the Moonlit Knight,” and of course the famous fox head that started it all. But for the live performances of The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway,” arguably Genesis’ most theatrical work, Peter only  donned two costumes for the entire 90+ minutes, and one of them was fairly nondescript.

The Rael costume involved little more than black jeans, a plain white t-shirt, and a black leather jacket. Peter used some make-up , mostly some black around the eyes to make him look more gaunt, but nothing else. As Rael, though, Peter didn’t look like Peter, which is of course the point of wearing a costume.

Rael

Rael

Even though The Lamb involved only two costumes, Peter’s showmanship wasn’t waning. While Rael wasn’t all that difficult, the other Lamb costume was his flashiest, his trickiest, and arguably his most famous. It was also something the entire band hated from the first time Peter wore it, especially Peter himself. The Slipperman was a bunch of green foams balls piled on top of each other, with holes for the arms and tights for the legs. It looked like a wretched, cancerous mass, barely distinguishable as a person. It worked very well in a story sense, since it matched the lyrics of “The Colony of Slippermen.”

His skin’s all covered in slimy lumps / With lips that slide across each chin / His twisted limbs like rubber stumps / Are waved in welcome, say “Please join in”

However, it was a nightmare in the practical sense. Peter needed a significant pause during the performance to get the costume on, which was the reason for “Silent Sorrow In Empty Boats,” a 3 minute instrumental that didn’t involve Peter. This was 1974, before the days of wireless mics or headsets. The only way for Peter’s voice to be amplified was for him to hold a mic like normal. The problem was the Slipperman costume didn’t really have a head. Not only was Peter blind, but he had to guess on where he was holding the mic. It’s amazing he could actually sing with that monstrosity on. Then after the song, the costume was a pain to get off and he needed the instrumental “Ravine” to go backstage and remove it. It was a lot of work for 8 minutes, but he did it every night.

Back to the story. After waking to find himself among people crawling on their hands and knees (who might be drug addicts) in “The Carpet Crawlers,” Rael finds himself in a room with 32 doors (“The Chamber of 32 Doors”). He gets out with the help of an old blind woman (“Lilywhite Lilith”) who was just leading him into the hands of Death himself (Anyway” and “Here Comes the Supernatural Anesthetist”). He survives his encounter with Death, and then comes across “three vermillion snakes of female face” (“The Lamia”). In a grand/weird/disturbing metaphor for sex, Rael gets into the lamias’ pool, shedding his shredded clothes, and the three lamia sensuously glide along his body. They then start to devour him, literally, taste-testing with their tongues and then nibbling his flesh. Rael is in ecstasy with this devouring, but the lamia convulse in pain and die. Then, in a final act of barbarism, Rael decides to eat the flesh of the dead lamia.

142 showmanship 03Clearly, this is the most disturbing thing on the record so far. Up until now it went from straightforward to surreal and slightly bizarre. With “The Lamia,” it takes a turn for the grotesque, and you don’t really see it coming. It reminds me of the first time I read Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor. The first few chapters are about a dude on a train and a street vendor selling a potato peeler gadget, and then suddenly Enoch is showing Hazel this mummified dwarf on display in a museum. My initial reaction was, “did that just happen??!?”

Next: jeez, what kind of sex are you having, Peter Gabriel? Never mind, don’t answer that…